What Are The Best Grilling Techniques? - Quit smoking and reclaim your life
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What Are The Best Grilling Techniques?


Summer is the best season to bring out that grill but going by the flavor that grilling imparts to the food, we would love to enjoy it all year long. Grilling is one of the oldest methods of cooking in the world, similar to food smoking. However, modern grilling methods have evolved a lot and are more concentrated on the flavor and aroma of the food. We would like to mention here that if you are a fan of smoky flavor then probably better off food smoking

Grilling is an easier and faster method of cooking meat but smoking imparts a unique smoky flavor to the food.  The smoky flavor is stronger in smoked food rather than grilled food. 

Here we are going to share some Bradley tips & tricks of grilling along with some hacks on food smoking too.

Techniques of grilling

There are numerous techniques to grill meat but two of them are popular ones. Searing and indirect grilling are the two techniques that almost sums up the grilling game for all types of foods. Here are the secrets to perfect searing and indirect grilling. 

Searing: It is a way to enhance the grilled flavor in the food. Searing caramelizes the edges of the meat making it crispy. To get the perfect searing, start with a really hot grill. Place the meat on the grill, lower temperature, and let it cook for a minute before flipping it to the other side. Now let it cook for some time and then increase the heat. The high temperature will sear the edges. 

Indirect grilling: This is a master technique to get juicy succulent steaks but it takes a little longer to reach perfect doneness. Indirect grilling means cooking the meat in indirect heat. Keep the meat on the grill and turn off the burner just below it. Let the surrounding burners heat up and cook the meat slowly for a little longer. You can choose to sear or not to sear the edges in indirect grilling. 

Tips for perfect grilling

Grilling may seem to be an easy task but it is not. Simply learning the basic technique is not enough. You will need some tips and tricks to get perfectly grilled steaks. Below are the top Bradley tips & tricks.

Grilling Tips

1. Clean the grill: Always start with a squeaky clean grill so that the flavor from the earlier cooked food doesn’t spoil the one you are grilling now. Cleaning the grill after cooking is also the best way to maintain it for years. 

2. Let the food rest: Don’t flip the food too often. This might cause uneven searing or the meat might not get cooked completely. 

3. Never squeeze the meat: Squeezing or flattening the meat can dry it up and leave it chewy after grilling. Let it rest on the heat until properly seared from one side. Use a spatula to check it gently and then flip to the other side. 

4. Moisten the food: Keep a spray bottle handy to prevent the meat from drying up. Spaying the meat frequently will keep it moist and tender even after cooking. 

5. Keep a thermometer: Use a thermometer to check if the meat has been cooked completely or to your desired doneness. For example, a whole ribeye should reach a temperature of at least 135 degrees Fahrenheit or 57 degrees Celsius. 

6. Rest it before serving: When the meat is grilling, the fat in it melts to secret juice. Rest it after grilling until the juice is completely absorbed turning the meat tender and succulent. 

Food Smoking hacks

We have already mentioned earlier that smoking imparts a strong and unique smoky flavor to the food that grilling can’t match. When the meat is cooked in hot smoke it becomes more flavorful, juicy, and tender. 

For those who are new to food smoking and super excited to try it, here are a few hacks. 

Brine the meat: Brining is the process of soaking the meat in a solution of salt and water. This increases the flavor and tenderness of the meat even after smoking. 

Use the best cuts: The best cuts of meat for smoking are generally the working muscles with more connective tissues. When these cuts of meat are heated, they melt to release juice that later gets absorbed turning it succulent and tender. Beef and pork are the best choices for food smoking. 

Cook slowly: Smoking is a slow and gradual process that helps the food to absorb the flavor completely. Try to cook in low heat to get the perfect smoky flavor. For example, ribs need to smoke for a total of at least 5 hours and the smoker should be between 225 to 240 degrees Fahrenheit or 107 to 110 degrees Celcius.

More Food Smoking Hacks:

Use quality food smoker: This is important to note that you can ace the art of food smoking with a pro food smoker. Thankfully, the Bradley Smoker comes with all the required features to work self-sufficiently to give you a perfect food smoking experience. 

Bradley Smokers have a digital console, auto-feed system, multiple heating elements, and more exclusive features to give a wonderful smoking experience even to beginners. 

Use the right firewood: Food smoking requires flavored wood, but the best option to not use it as fuel. Each type of food needs to be cooked in certain flavored firewood. For instance, oak is used for larger cuts while cherry for light meats, fish, etc.

Bradley Bisquettes are here to the rescue. Bradley Bisquettes are specially flavored wood chips that burn longer than normal wood. Bradley Bisquettes are available in 17 different flavors with complete instructions about the type of food each of them is suitable for.  

We hope these Bradley tips & tricks on grilling and smoking were useful to you. Try them out based on your preferences and a need for convenience. While grilled food will in no way disappoint you, smoked food will definitely win your heart. 

For more great ideas on how to get the most of your Bradley Smoker, check out the awesome articles on our Bradley Smoker Food Smoking Blog for more tips & tricks.

The post What Are The Best Grilling Techniques? appeared first on Bradley Smokers North America.



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